Working Girl

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Back in the Golden Age, any average Joe or Jane could fight crime as long as they possessed a can-do attitude and a good right hook. No character embodies this fact more than Kay McKay, Air Hostess.

Not only is McKay tough enough to survive a daredevil leap out of an airplane, she even possesses the moxy to fend off a pack of wild man-faced dog creatures. If the ill-fated Christina Ricci vehicle, Pan Am, had half as much action that series might have lasted an entire season.

The untitled story originally appeared in Captain Courageous Comics #6 (Ace Periodicals, March 1942). The art is credited to George Wilson.

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Return Of The King

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Nothing can get me off my big, fat, non-blogging butt faster than the 97th anniversary of Jack “King” Kirby’s birth!

To celebrate, here’s a classic tale written and drawn by The King himself from Harvey’s post-Code science-fiction anthology, Alarming Tales. Entitled “Forbidden Journey,” the main character of the tale embodies the adventurous spirit that typified Kirby’s own career over the decades.

The story originally appeared in Alarming Tales #4 (Harvey Comics, March 1958).

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The last panel just seems to sum up everything regarding Jack Kirby and his contributions to comics and culture in general. We are all in his debt.

If you would like to own higher quality reprints of Kirby’s (and Joe Simon’s) science-fiction work with Harvey and other publishers, pick up the beautiful hardcover collection issued in 2013 by Titan Books,  The Simon And Kirby Library: Science Fiction ASAP!

All-American Girl

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It’s already been several months since the last post? Time flies when you’re busy catching up on Boardwalk Empire

I recently happened upon a rave review for a new book that celebrates the can-do super-women of 1940s comics, Mike Madrid’s Divas, Dames And Daredevils: Lost Heroines of the Golden Age.

From what I gather, Madrid’s thesis regarding Wonder Woman and other first-generation heroines parallels my own longstanding belief that the original super-women and girls displayed more strength and determination than many of their Silver and Bronze Age counterparts.

(Maybe even a few modern age characters as well, given that none of the Class of ’39 and ’40 were saddled with sexual assault back-stories like Marvel’s Black Cat or DC’s pre-Nu52 Helena Bertinelli.)

Such sentiments, of course, compel me to get off my fat @$$ and post another adventure featuring one of my favorite Golden-Age super-heroines, Miss Victory! The story originally appeared in Captain Aero Comics vol. 3 #11 (Temerson/Helnit/Continental, January 1944).

The art is by Nina Albright, who blazed a few trails of her own as a comic-book artist in the medium’s early days. Here’s “Noric – The Maniac Of The Opera.”

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Who needs Captain America when Miss Victory’s on the job?

Along Came A Spider Man

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The Time Bullet is briskly moving along at a two-post-per-month clip these days, which by my estimation should ensure this site’s eventual domination of the Blog-O-Net by the year 3025.

Of course, by that time, blogging about pop culture artifacts should be obsolete – if it isn’t already. We at Time Bullet Central are not concerned about such mundane matters, however, as long as there are still action-packed Golden Age comics scans to unearth and share with the unseen masses.

Here’s one such story featuring one of our favorite super-heroes, Bulletman, taking on one of comics’ many arachnid-themed super-villains. As always, the adventure is enlivened by the presence of Bulletgirl, one of the more competent super-heroines of the Golden Age.

“The Black Spider” originally appeared in Bulletman #1 (Fawcett, Summer 1941). The story was penciled and inked by Charles Sultan, a prolific artist whose long career included illustrating pulps and men’s magazines.

There is no writer credit.

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Poor Suzy! I guess that’s why the Comics Code was created…

Bullet The Blue Sky

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If Dick Briefer worked in the modern comic-book industry, Internet fandom would probably condemn the writer-artist for his overly stylized, cartoony style.

As those familiar with Briefer’s Frankenstein can attest, however, the legendary creator was just as proficient at straight-up horror as big-foot humor. Like Jack Cole, Briefer possessed the talent, imagination and skill to make any sort of story work.

Submitted tonight for your approval, Time Bulleteer, is a Western tale that illustrates how Briefer’s “cartoony” approach transformed a rather typical “outlaw terrorizes community” story into an effective story of brutality and eye-for-an-eye justice.

(In my opinion, Briefer’s art makes the story’s black-humored denouement more disturbing to modern eyes…)

From Dead-Eye Western Comics vol. 1 #8 (Hillman, February 1950), here’s “Rattler Matt: Horned Toad Of The West” by Briefer.

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